National Midget Auto Racing Hall of Fame Inductees


The National Midget Auto Racing Hall of Fame currently has 24 motorsports-related inductees.




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Track Announcer


Midget
Stock Car

 
From the time Wayne Adams saw his first midget race in the fall of 1936, he was bitten by the racing bug. A native of St. Joseph, Mo., the 17-year-old Adams witnessed his first midget auto race indoors at Chicago’s 124th Field Artillery Armory, not far from where Adams lived. A little over 10 years later (1947), Adams would find himself the track announcer at three Chicago area midget racing venues – Hanson Park Stadium, Raceway Park and Soldier Field. Becoming a big fan of auto racing, Adams acquired an old German camera and began “shooting” the racing action, selling black and white, and 8 x 10 photos for 50 cents each. Adams became the official scorer at Raceway Park early in the season of the 1940 campaign. Late in 1940, Adams began writing for Walter Bull’s Illustrated Speedway News, the weekly racing newspaper based in Brooklyn, N.Y. The Chicago area-based United Auto Racing Association (UARA) midget racing organization was born during the winter of 1946 and 1947. Hanson Park Stadium on Chicago's northwest side would be the site of UARA's initial event in the spring of 1947. The Hanson Park arena saw the UARA midget drivers do battle weekly during 1947. A dispute between UARA officials and the first night announcer resulted in UARA hierarchy asking Adams to announce the second event of the season. During Adams’ announcing debut, Raceway Park promoters, Nick and Pete Jenin were in the stands and after the races asked Adams if he would be interested in announcing the races at their track on Saturdays. A little later, Solider Field promoter Art Folz contacted Adams about announcing his Sunday programs. “I announced over 100 programs in 1948,” recalled Adams years later. “I was announcing five to seven times a week, sometimes doing one track on Sunday afternoon and another one that evening. I was also doing six to eight stories for Illustrated, plus doing my column (Midwest Whispers).” Adams eventually turned his attention full time to Raceway Park, where he would announce over 2,000 race programs, the majority being stock car events, until his retirement at the close of the 1989 season

 
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Driver / Professional

 
 




Official / Promoter
Team Owner


American Motorcycle Assoc.
Big Car - AAA

 
 
Argentina Flag




Driver / Professional

 
 



George
Amick

Passed away in 1959 at the age of 35.
 
 



Picture of Chuck Arnold
Chuck
Arnold

Passed away in 1997 at the age of 71.

Driver / Professional
Official / Promoter


American Race Drivers Club
NASCAR - Midgets
North East Midget Association
USAC - IndyCar
USAC - Midgets

 
Chuck Arnold was one of the nation’s top Midget drivers through the 1950s and 1960s. He competed with the NASCAR, NEMA, ARDC and USAC midget’s organizations scoring many victories with each group. He also found time to compete in the URC sprint cars and TQ series. He ran Indy cars competing in the 1959 Indy 500. He was the ARDC Most Improved Driver in 1952. When NASCAR starting sanctioning midget races in 1953, Chuck was a standout especially in the long distance shows, he finished fourth in points the first season. In 1954 to took home the NASCAR Drivers’ Championship and finished second in 1955 to fellow Inductee Freddie Meeker. Chuck moved out to the Midwest to take on the USAC circuit in the mid-1960s. He recorded 14 feature victories in USAC competition before his retirement in the early 1970’s. He then served as the USAC Western States Midget Chief Steward from 1975-1981.

 




Car Owner
Official / Promoter


American Race Drivers Club
USAC - IndyCar
USAC - Midgets

 
Ken Brenn Sr. remains one of the most respected car owners in midget auto racing. His incredible victory as the winning car owner at Lime Rock, Connecticut road racing circuit on July 25,1959 with Indy 500 winner Rodger Ward driving, remains one of midget auto racing’s greatest stories. With his Offy midget they raced against and beat some of the top cars and drivers from the Formula 1 and LeMans series on a road course. Over the years his impeccably prepared cars, nearly always carrying # 24, were much sought after and attracted some of midget racing’s top drivers, including Ward, Len Duncan, Bobby Unser, Larry Dickson, Don Branson, Johnny Coy SR, Jimmy Caruthers and a host of other top drivers from the east coast. The five-time ARDC Championship car owner, who served in nearly every official capacity for the club, was also the mayor of Warren, New Jersey. He provided a great deal of business acumen and professionalism to the sport which clearly elevated the image of midget auto racing over the years

 



 
Stephen "Steve" Cannon from the racing capital of Danville Illinois scored 21 United States Auto Club (USAC) National midget series wins during his sixteen-year midget racing career. Most remarkable is that Steve matched the win totals of fellow Hall of Fame members Rex Easton and Jimmy Caruthers in just 219 career starts. Steve was sometimes often too busy to race - in addition to midget racing, he was also a barber, like his brothers, ran an insurance agency and was a 29-year member of the Danville Fire Department. Steve began racing modified stock cars during the early nineteen sixties and by 1969 was a strong competitor in ‘Class A’ supermodifieds at the Williamson County Speedway in Marion Illinois. 1970 found Steve in competition in a midget with the St. Louis Auto Racing Association (SLARA), and then in 1971, Steve notched his first and second career USAC midget wins at Santa Fe Speedway and Quad Cities Speedway in a span of just two days. After a solid 1973 season in which he notched five USAC wins, in 1974 Steve started the season with a victory at the Fort Wayne Indiana Memorial Coliseum and the Indoor championship, then led all USAC Midget racers with a season-high six wins. In 1976 Steve had another sterling season, with three USAC victories. In two of the most prestigious midget races of 1976, Steve finished as the runner-up to Gary Bettenhausen in the “Night before the 500” and he followed Bob Wente across the finish line in the “Hut Hundred” at the Terre Haute Action Track. Cannon was an adept racer indoors as he won a total of three features at Fort Wayne and in 1978 he beat a star-studded field to win a 100-lap race inside the Indiana State Fair Coliseum. Steve Cannon was one of the most efficient midget racers ever, as he won nearly 10 percent of his starts and finished on the podium 25% of the time, an enviable record

 




Driver / Sportsman


American Race Drivers Club
Big Car - AAA


Midget

 
 
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Driver / Professional


USAC - IndyCar

 
Jimmy Davies, of Gardena, Calif., was a three-time USAC National Midget Champion, taking consecutive titles in 1960, 1961 and 1962. His 48 career Midget victories still rank sixth on USAC’s all-time National Midget win list. A winner at age 20 in the ill-fated 1949 Del Mar, Calif. AAA 100-miler which claimed the life of Rex Mays, Davies would eventually compete in five Indianapolis 500s, recording his best finish of third in 1955. He also won USAC’s Pacific Coast Midget title in 1960 and scored three victories in the prestigious “Night Before the 500” classic. Proficient in his appearances “down under,” Davies won the 1963 Australian Speedcar Grand Prix and the 1963 and 1964 South Australian Speedcar titles. He lost his life in a 1966 Midget race at Santa Fe Park Speedway in Hinsdale, Ill. and in 1984 was inducted into the National Midget Auto Racing Hall of Fame.  
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Driver / Sportsman


USAC - Midgets


Midget

 
 



Picture of Len Duncan
Len
Duncan

Passed away in 1998 at the age of 87.

Driver / Professional


American Race Drivers Club
Big Car - AAA
NASCAR - Midgets
North East Midget Association
USAC - Midgets

 
Duncan, of Lansdale, PA, had a racing career spanning seven decades, beginning in 1928 and continuing into the 1980s in TQ midgets! In 1953, 1954 and 1955, when AAA had a working agreement with the American Racing Drivers Club (ARDC), he was the AAA Eastern Midget Champion, and during the thirteen years between 1955 and 1967, he won the ARDC title eight times. During World War II, Len had the honor of being assigned as President Truman’s driver during one of his visits to England. He drove in the Indianapolis 500 in 1954 and had relief from George Fonder. The pair completed 101 laps and placed 31st. Mario Andretti credits Duncan with having a great influence on his professional life

 



 
 




Builder Chassis
Builder Engines
Tuner


USAC - IndyCar

 
Bob Higman, of Lafayette, Ind., was instrumental in the growth of USAC’s National Midget Series in so many ways, from providing top-flight cars for the top drivers to his insightful assistance into rules making as part of USAC’s Advisory Board of Directors. His list of major drivers ran the gamut of America’s greatest talent and he was directly responsible for USAC Midget Championships for drivers Bob Wente (1963), Mike McGreevy (1966) and Larry Rice (1973). The only man to build a successful turbo-charged Offy Midget engine, he served as the crew chief for Indianapolis 500 driver Jigger Sirois who nearly stole the pole starting position in 1969. Bob’s enormous contributions resulted in his induction into the National Midget Auto Racing Hall of Fame in 1995. He was also awarded USAC’s “Jim Blunk Award” for contributions to Midget racing in 1973 and the prestigious Eddie Edenburn Award in 1988  
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Official / Promoter


USAC - Midgets

 
Tommy Hunt is the second member of a three-generation racing family which through the year demonstrated excellence in multiple facets of our sport which includes mechanical innovation, driving, and promotion. Tommy was born on December 22 1946, the son of Joe Hunt, who after World War 2 successfully adapted aircraft magnetos as a reliable self-contained energy source to power racing engines. Only a few short years after the Joe Hunt Magnetos company was founded, Hunt’s magnetos were used by every car in the Indianapolis 500-mile race starting field. Joe Hunt himself became a championship car owner in 1954 and fielded entries at the Indianapolis Motor Speedway until 1981. At fourteen, Tommy designed the paint scheme for his father’s 1960 Wayne Ewing-built Indianapolis entry and by 1968, was a mechanic on the Joe Hunt Magnetos 1968 Indianapolis entry, the upright Lesovsky dirt car powered by a turbocharged Offenhauser engine in which Gary Bettenhausen passed his Speedway rookie test. 1968 also marked Tommy’s debut behind the wheel of a CRA sprint car - he competed during CRA’s halcyon years of the 1970’s with such legends as Dean Thompson and Jimmy Oskie and scored three CRA main event wins during his career. In addition to his CRA racing, Tommy raced midgets with USAC and USRC on occasion before he retired from driving after 1982 following a serious sprint car crash at El Centro California. In 1986, Tommy was named the USAC Western Supervisor by his mentor, Roger McCluskey, and then in 1988 became the USAC Vice-President of Western Operations for the next 25 years. Under Hunt’s leadership, the USAC Western States midget series grew from a weekday program at Ascot Park to boast a 46-race slate for the 1988 and 1989 seasons. In 2002, together with engine builder Keith Iala, Hunt introduced the USAC Ford Focus midget series, an economical open-wheel entry-level class for both racers and track promoters. Among its graduates are 6-time USAC champion Darren Hagan and NASCAR racers Nick Drake and Alex Bowman. Tommy Hunt’s vision of expanding racing opportunities for racers led him to create the USAC Formula Russell Pro Series and the stillborn USAC Sabre series, both designed to allow USAC short-track racers to hone their skills with the technology of aerodynamic rear-engine race cars. Even after his retirement from USAC in 2013, Hunt continues to work as an advocate for short-track racing and serve the racing community, with the help of his wife Jeanie in a variety of projects including the promotion of Calistoga Speedway and the operation of Hunt’s Race World in Roseville California. Their son, Tony, the third generation of the racing Hunt family, is an 11-time USAC driving champion. In addition to receiving the Jim Blunk Award in 1998, for his outstanding contributions to the sport of midget car racing, the Roger McCluskey Award of Excellence in 2002, and in 2006, the Eddie Edenburn Award, both of which recognized his commitment to the overall sport of auto racing and his numerous contributions to USAC,

 



 
The dictionary defines a Champion as one who fights for a cause; defender; protector and valiant fighter. Dick Jordan may have never driven or own a midget, but never the less he is still a Champion of Midget racing. Racing has always been a part of Dick’s life; he attended races with his parents in the early 50’s. In 1968 he was hired to work at the United States Auto Club, where he worked for forty plus years. Regardless of his job description, one thing never changed his love and devotion to the sport. Dick was one of the founding members of the National Midget Auto Racing Hall and served on its Board, and as an officer of the organization. Dick is one of the few officials who have been inducted into both the National Sprint Car Hall of Fame and the National Midget Auto Racing Hall of Fame.

 




Driver / Professional


USAC - Midgets

 
 




Driver / Sportsman


Big Car - AAA
United Racing Association

 
 
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Official / Promoter


Rocky Mountain Midget Racing Assoc.

 
 




Driver / Sportsman


Big Car - AAA


Midget

 
 
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Picture of Ed (Dutch) Shaefer
Ed (Dutch)
Shaefer

Passed away in 1978 at the age of 63.

Driver / Professional
Official / Promoter


American Race Drivers Club
Super Midget Racing Club

 
Remembered as the man who saved the ARDC from extinction, Dutch Schaefer was more than a great President, he was one whale of a race car driver. Dutch began his winning ways in 1940 by winning the Cedarhurst, New York Championship. He won the track Champ-ionship at Philadelphia’s Yellow Jacket Speedway in both 1946 and 1948. Schaefer was elected President of the oldest midget racing club in the East in 1952. Near the point of extinction, Dutch managed to hold together a small group of devoted ARDC car owners and drivers, and brought the club and midget racing on the East Coast, back into the limelight. It is ironic that in 1968 , the year Ed “Dutch” Schaefer was displaced as the President of the Club, ARDC scheduled 51 races and raced for prize money exceeding $93,000. Schaefer won the ARDC Championship in 1956, ’57, ’60 and ’65. He won a USAC race at Hershey, Pa. beating the nation’s top drivers by a full lap. Dutch was the President of the Super Midget Racing Club and won that club’s title in 1973

 



Company
Stewart-Haas Racing
Title
Driver / Professional

Driver / Professional
Team Owner


ARCA
International Race of Champions
IRL - IndyCar
NASCAR - Cup Car Series
NASCAR - Grand-Am
NASCAR - Truck Series
NASCAR - Whelen
Sprint Car - Dirt
USAC - Midgets


Midget
Stock Car

 
became the first driver ever to claim all three of USAC’s National championships in a single season (in 1995) and is one of only six USAC “Triple Crown Champions.” He won the 1994 USAC National Midget title, then added the Midget, Sprint and Silver Crown honors the next season. Proficient in virtually every form of motorsports, he has earned three NASCAR Cup championships (2002, 2005 and 2011) and a 1997 Indy Racing League title. He has 27 USAC National Midget wins to his credit, as well as 10 wins in the Sprint cars and three in the Silver Crown series. A member of the National Midget Hall of Fame (2001), his list of impressive motorsports awards and accolades continues to grow. In five Indianapolis 500 appearances, he started first in 1996, finished fifth from the front row in 1997, was ninth in 1999 and sixth in 2001. His charitable contributions through his Tony Stewart Foundation are endless. In addition to his USAC driving titles, he also has seven Sprint Car Owner championships as well as seven in the Silver Crown Series as an owner.  
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Driver / Professional


IRL - IndyCar
USAC - IndyCar

 
Bob continues to rank fourth on USAC’s all-time Midget winners list with 63 total victories. In 1969 he claimed the USAC National Midget Championship. As an ambassador for America, he travelled to New Zealand and Australia, winning over 50% of his races during a 13-year stretch! In 1966, he passed a Rookie Test at the Indianapolis Motor Speedway but was unable to secure a starting spot in the 500. Starting in stock cars, he switched to Midgets in 1950 and earned a pair of UARA Midget crowns. He debuted in USAC in 1960 and, in the ensuing 11 years, he never finished worse than eighth in the standings.  
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Driver / Sportsman

 
 
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